Trevogue

transistoradio:

Francis Bacon, Three Studies for Self-Portrait (1976), oil on canvas, in three parts; set 39 3/4 x 14 inches, individual panels 12 x 14 inches. Via I’m not a person…

transistoradio:

Francis Bacon, Three Studies for Self-Portrait (1976), oil on canvas, in three parts; set 39 3/4 x 14 inches, individual panels 12 x 14 inches. Via I’m not a person…







ANNE SEXTON 
It’s in the heart of the grapewhere that smile lies.It’s in the good-bye-bow in the hairwhere that smile lies.It’s in the clerical collar of the dresswhere that smile lies.What smile? The smile of my seventh year, caught here in the painted photograph.It’s peeling now, age has got it, a kind of cancer of the backgroundand also in the assorted features.It’s like a rotten flagor a vegetable from the refrigerator, pocked with mold.I am aging without sound, into darkness, darkness.Anne, who are you? I open the veinand my blood rings like roller skates.I open the mouthand my teeth are an angry army.I open the eyesand they go sick like dogswith what they have seen.I open the hairand it falls apart like dust balls.I open the dressand I see a child bent on a toilet seat.I crouch there, sitting dumblypushing the enemas out like ice cream, letting the whole brown worldturn into sweets.Anne, who are you? Merely a kid keeping alive. 

Anne Sexton
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Anne_Sexton

ANNE SEXTON 

It’s in the heart of the grape
where that smile lies.
It’s in the good-bye-bow in the hair
where that smile lies.
It’s in the clerical collar of the dress
where that smile lies.
What smile? 
The smile of my seventh year, 
caught here in the painted photograph.

It’s peeling now, age has got it, 
a kind of cancer of the background
and also in the assorted features.
It’s like a rotten flag
or a vegetable from the refrigerator, 
pocked with mold.
I am aging without sound, 
into darkness, darkness.

Anne, 
who are you? 

I open the vein
and my blood rings like roller skates.
I open the mouth
and my teeth are an angry army.
I open the eyes
and they go sick like dogs
with what they have seen.
I open the hair
and it falls apart like dust balls.
I open the dress
and I see a child bent on a toilet seat.
I crouch there, sitting dumbly
pushing the enemas out like ice cream, 
letting the whole brown world
turn into sweets.

Anne, 
who are you? 

Merely a kid keeping alive. 

areaofdesign:

Charles Demuth:
painter


(1883-1935)

Born: Lancaster, Pennsylvania

Charles Demuth was one of the most stylistically innovative watercolor artists of the 20th century. The son of a wealthy Lancaster (Pennsylvania) tobacco merchant, Demuth never had to seek social approval or work for a living.

His introverted, imaginative character was strengthened by a childhood hip illness that left him partly lame and emotionally dependent on his mother. He received some art lessons as a teenager but, two years after graduating high school (1903), he enrolled in introductory art courses at Philadelphia’s Drexel Institute of Art, Science, and Industry, then (from 1905-10) completed his studies at the Pennsylvania Academy of Fine Arts. There he trained in painting under Thomas Anshutz (a pupil of Thomas Eakins), came in contact with Japanese art, and perfected his persona as a dandyfied and world weary esthete after the manner of James McNeil Whistler, Aubrey Beardsley and Oscar Wilde.

He twice voyaged to Paris and Berlin, in 1907 and 1912-13, where he saw firsthand works by Cezanne, the Fauves, the German Expressionists, met expatriate Americans such as John Marin and Marsden Hartley, and enrolled in drawing courses at the Académie Moderne.

He returned to live in Lancaster after the death of his father in 1912, and began a lifelong relationship with the architect Robert Locher. But he also frequented the artistic circle around Alfred Stieglitz (1864-1946) in New York City, and spent summer vacations at New England’s seaside resorts.

He had his first solo exhibition in 1914, in New York, and quickly expanded his watercolor style toward bright colors, expressive drawing, and socially complex subjects. He also began to tackle more ambitious and serious landscapes in an increasingly refined and abstract style.

In 1920, Demuth was diagnosed with diabetes and was often incapacitated by diabetic attacks, yet he continued to work in Lancaster and travel to New York. He made a final trip to Europe in 1921, fell seriously ill, and was brought home by his mother for insulin treatment at the Morristown Sanitarium in New Jersey. He never regained full health, and spent most of the rest of his life working at home, a diabetic invalid.

In the late 1920s and early 1930s, Demuth created large works in oil that range from prophetic Pop iconography (his famous I Saw The Figure 5 in Gold, 1928) and poster art to the urban industrial visions of Precisionism. He exhibited in numerous solo shows and in group shows with artists such as Marin, O’Keeffe, Dove, Hartley, and Alfred Stieglitz. Over a period of two decades he produced more than one thousand drawings and paintings.

Demuth died of complications from diabetes in 1935, at age 51. In his will he bequeathed his watercolors to Robert Locher and all his other works to Georgia O’Keeffe.

Paul Wonner was born in Tucson in 1920, and moved to the Bay Area for the first time to study at California College of Arts and Crafts in Oakland (now California College of the Arts), where he earned a Bachelor’s degree in 1941. After military service in Texas, Wonner moved to New York, where he worked as a package designer and briefly continued his training at the Art Students League. He returned to the Bay Area in 1950 and by 1953 completed Bachelor’s and Master’s degrees in fine arts at UC Berkeley. Wonner then worked as a librarian at UC Davis in the late 1950s, until his move to Southern California, where he taught at the Otis Art Institute in Los Angeles and UC Santa Barbara during the 1960s. He enjoyed collegial support for his work from originators of the Bay Area Figurative style, including David Park (1911-1960) and Richard Diebenkorn (1922-1993). He painted in a brushy manner similar to theirs until the late 1970s, when his style turned crisp, emphasizing bright light and sharp shadows, and he concentrated on still life themes. The Dutch Baroque still life tradition served as a historical source for Wonner, but he typically painted objects from everyday contemporary life. His mature pictures distinctively portray things as separated by almost surrealistically vacant distended spaces. Acclaimed for his distinctive mature style of still life painting, had numerous solo exhibitions in New York, Los Angeles and San Francisco. Major museums throughout the United States have collected his work. In recent years, he returned to painting human figures in vaguely allegorical arrangements and settings.

http://www.pinterest.com/search/pins/?q=paul%20wonner

loverofbeauty:

Francis Bacon:  Figures in Interior  (1950s)  Drawing

loverofbeauty:

Francis Bacon:  Figures in Interior  (1950s)  Drawing